MIL-OSI Security: Springfield, Illinois, Woman Sentenced to 54 Months for Bank Robbery

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Source: Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) State Crime News

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – A Springfield, Illinois, woman, Heather Horrighs, 44, was sentenced on January 10, 2024, by U.S. District Judge Colleen R. Lawless to 54 months in prison, to be followed by three years of supervised release, for bank robbery.

At the sentencing hearing, the Court found that Horrighs and co-defendant Theodis Parnell jointly planned to rob the Alliance Community Bank located at 6530 North IL-29 in Springfield, IL. On September 13, 2021, Parnell drove Horrighs to the area of the bank where he remained in the vehicle with the engine running. Horrighs then entered the bank with a package that she said contained a bomb. After receiving money from two tellers, Horrighs left the bank and Parnell acted as the getaway driver. The pair stole a total of $12,888 from the bank. Parnell was previously sentenced to 51 months in federal prison.

Horrighs was indicted in November 2021 and pleaded guilty in January 2023. She has remained in the custody of the United States Marshal Service since her arrest.

The statutory penalties for bank robbery are up to 20 years in prison, up to a $250,000 fine, and up to three years supervised release.

This case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigations, Springfield Field Office, with assistance from the Springfield Police Department and the Sangamon County Sheriff’s Office. Assistant United States Attorney Matthew Z. Weir represented the government in the prosecution.

The case against Horrighs and Parnell is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and gun violence, and to make our neighborhoods safer for everyone. On May 26, 2021, the Department launched a violent crime reduction strategy strengthening PSN based on these core principles: fostering trust and legitimacy in our communities, supporting community-based organizations that help prevent violence from occurring in the first place, setting focused and strategic enforcement priorities, and measuring the results.

MIL Security OSI