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Deadly poison hemlock and spotted water hemlock found in Delaware – State of Delaware News

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Deadly poison hemlock and spotted water hemlock found in DelawareDate Posted: July 2, 2021
Skunk in Newark Tests Positive For RabiesDate Posted: July 1, 2021
Governor Carney Announces Summer Acceleration MilestonesDate Posted: July 1, 2021
STATEMENTS: Governor Carney and Dr. Rattay on Delaware Reaching 70 Percent Vaccination GoalDate Posted: July 1, 2021
July 10, 2021 Trivia Event at Johnson Victrola Museum CancelledDate Posted: July 1, 2021
Energy Program Services Available OnlineDate Posted: July 1, 2021
Governor Carney Signs Fiscal Year 2022 Operating and Capital BudgetsDate Posted: June 30, 2021
Governor Carney Signs Legislation to Expand and Make Permanent Opportunity Funding in Schools Date Posted: June 30, 2021
Scientists Investigate Mysterious Songbird Deaths in Delaware, Several Other States and D.C. AreaDate Posted: June 30, 2021
20 Delaware Teachers Named Local Teachers of the YearDate Posted: June 30, 2021
Auditor McGuiness: Time to Reform Pharmacy Benefit Manager’s Oversight of State Employees’ Prescription Drug PlanDate Posted: June 30, 2021
Statement from AG Jennings on House passage of Senate Bill 147Date Posted: June 29, 2021
Garrisons Lake Boat Ramp to Temporarily Close for ReconstructionDate Posted: June 29, 2021
June 29, 2021: COVID-19 BriefingDate Posted: June 29, 2021
Office of the State Treasurer Completes ARPA Funds DistributionDate Posted: June 29, 2021
Delaware Office Of Highway Safety Activates July 4th Statewide DUI Checkpoints + Soberlift Program At The BeachesDate Posted: June 28, 2021
Every Public School Student Now Has Digital Access To BooksDate Posted: June 28, 2021
Governor Carney Announces Additional DE Wins Raffle PrizesDate Posted: June 28, 2021
Work Based Learning & Jobs For Students And Adults With DisabilitiesDate Posted: June 28, 2021
2021 Diabetes Report Recommends Increasing Access to Programs and Establishing Delaware Diabetes RegistryDate Posted: June 28, 2021
Delaware Engine Crew Fighting Colorado WildfireDate Posted: June 28, 2021
Weekly COVID-19 Update – June 25, 2021: Delaware Nears President Biden’s Vaccination GoalDate Posted: June 25, 2021
Governor Carney, DPH, DEMA Announce COVID-19 Vaccination and Testing SitesDate Posted: June 25, 2021
Dejoynay Ferguson Sentenced to Life In Prison for Murder, Abuse of Child VictimsDate Posted: June 25, 2021
Ruth Ann Irwin, BG (Ret.) Sworn in as the U.S. Selective Service System’s Delaware State DirectorDate Posted: June 25, 2021
STATEMENT: Governor Carney on Bipartisan Infrastructure FrameworkDate Posted: June 24, 2021
STATEMENT: Governor Carney on Fiscal Year 2022 Budget Passing General AssemblyDate Posted: June 24, 2021
Statement from AG Jennings on final passage of House Bill 195Date Posted: June 24, 2021
Historical Affairs to Sponsor 4 Programs During July 2021Date Posted: June 24, 2021
El gobernador Carney levantará el Estado de Emergencia por COVID-19 el 13 de julioDate Posted: June 24, 2021
Rebate Program for Electric Vehicles ExtendedDate Posted: June 24, 2021
Governor Carney Issues Statement on Senate ConfirmationsDate Posted: June 23, 2021
Youth Fishing Tournament Results AnnouncedDate Posted: June 23, 2021
Delaware emitirá beneficios de emergencia para Junio para hogares elegibles de SNAP, TANF y de asistencia generalDate Posted: June 22, 2021
Del. Will Issue Emergency Benefits for June to All SNAP Households, Eligible TANF and General Assistance HouseholdsDate Posted: June 22, 2021
June 22, 2021: COVID-19 BriefingDate Posted: June 22, 2021
State Auditor McGuiness Demands $24.5M in Overcharges Back From State Employees’ PBM, Express ScriptsDate Posted: June 21, 2021
AG Jennings Announces More than 120 Charges in NorthPak Gang IndictmentDate Posted: June 21, 2021
Governor’s Organ and Tissue Donor Awareness Board Honors Statewide Winners of Video PSA Scholarship ContestDate Posted: June 21, 2021
Weekly COVID-19 Update – June 18, 2021: Delaware Cases, Hospitalizations On Steady DeclineDate Posted: June 18, 2021
Student State Board of Education Member Application Due July 2Date Posted: June 18, 2021
Governor Carney, DPH, DEMA Announce COVID-19 Vaccination and Testing SitesDate Posted: June 18, 2021
State Auditor McGuiness Estimates State Overpaid Its Pharmacy Benefit Manager by $24.5 Million over Three YearsDate Posted: June 17, 2021
Governor Carney Signs Black History Education LegislationDate Posted: June 17, 2021
Governor, DHSS Offer Providers Second Round of COVID-19 Support through Health Care Relief FundDate Posted: June 17, 2021
AG Jennings applauds Senate passage of opioid settlement legislationDate Posted: June 16, 2021
Delaware Forum on Racial History and JuneteenthDate Posted: June 16, 2021
Unfair Business Practices Bill Passes Senate, Ready for Governor’s Signature Date Posted: June 15, 2021
AG Jennings Announces Formal Murder Charge in Killing of Cpl. Keith HeacookDate Posted: June 15, 2021
Governor Carney to Lift COVID-19 State of Emergency on July 13Date Posted: June 15, 2021
June 15, 2021: COVID-19 BriefingDate Posted: June 15, 2021
Childcare Out-Of-School Care Resources WorkshopDate Posted: June 14, 2021
Community Leaders Unveil All-Electric Bus, Ag Pod and Solar + Battery Storage Technology at The WarehouseDate Posted: June 14, 2021
Outdoor Delaware Online Magazine Wins National AwardDate Posted: June 14, 2021
Governor Carney, DPH, DEMA Announce COVID-19 Vaccination and Testing SitesDate Posted: June 11, 2021
Weekly COVID-19 Update – June 11, 2021: Delaware Cases Continue to Decline, Hospitalizations UnchangedDate Posted: June 11, 2021
Governor Carney Announces Judicial Nomination Date Posted: June 10, 2021
Ferris School Lacrosse Team Hosts 2021 SeasonDate Posted: June 10, 2021
Sussex County Farm Family Receives Delaware Secretary’s Award for AgricultureDate Posted: June 10, 2021
Governor Carney Announces Additional DE Wins! Raffle PrizesDate Posted: June 10, 2021
DNREC to Hold Pharmaceutical Rule Training WebinarDate Posted: June 10, 2021
Junior Partners in Policy-Making NEW DEADLINEDate Posted: June 9, 2021
Office of the State Treasurer Begins Multimillion Dollar Distribution to Local MunicipalitiesDate Posted: June 9, 2021
Free Webinar on June 29 Features Coastal Restoration ToolkitDate Posted: June 9, 2021
DNREC Lifts Shelter-in-Place Directive for Area in New Castle CountyDate Posted: June 8, 2021
DNREC Issues Shelter in Place Directive for New Castle County After I-95 Crash Involving Hazardous MaterialDate Posted: June 8, 2021
DNREC Releases NCCo Community Air Monitoring ResultsDate Posted: June 8, 2021
Students honored in webapp mapping competitionDate Posted: June 8, 2021
June 8, 2021: COVID-19 BriefingDate Posted: June 8, 2021
Governor Carney Announces First Round of DE Wins! Small Business Grant WinnersDate Posted: June 7, 2021
Weekly Covid-19 Update – June 4, 2021: Delaware Cases Continue Downward TrendDate Posted: June 4, 2021
Governor Carney, DPH, DEMA Announce COVID-19 Vaccination and Testing SitesDate Posted: June 4, 2021
Governor Carney Issues Pride Month Proclamation, LGBTQ+ Action Plan for State EmployeesDate Posted: June 4, 2021
Governor Carney Appoints Special Assistant to Oversee Stimulus Funding, Nominates Department of Correction CommissionerDate Posted: June 4, 2021
Criminal Justice and Disability Webinar SeriesDate Posted: June 2, 2021
COVID -19 Stops with USDate Posted: June 2, 2021
First Lady Tracey Quillen Carney, Delaware Libraries Announce 2021 Summer Library Reading ProgramDate Posted: June 2, 2021
Ferris School Recognized as 2021 Finalist for National Juvenile Justice Award Date Posted: June 2, 2021
Gordons Pond Area of Cape Henlopen State Park to Be Closed Wednesday and FridayDate Posted: June 1, 2021
June 1, 2021: COVID-19 BriefingDate Posted: June 1, 2021
Flag Lowering for Memorial DayDate Posted: May 31, 2021
Weekly COVID-19 Update – May 28, 2021: Delaware Sees Lowest Number of Cases Since AugustDate Posted: May 28, 2021
DNREC Closes Fort Delaware until June 4 for Ferry RepairsDate Posted: May 28, 2021
Governor Carney, DPH, DEMA Announce Community COVID-19 Testing SitesDate Posted: May 28, 2021
Governor to Nominate Eugene Young as Director of Delaware State Housing Authority (DSHA)Date Posted: May 28, 2021
Office of Highway Safety Upgrades “Walk Smart, Arrive Alive” Campaign to Increase Safety Over Memorial Day WeekendDate Posted: May 27, 2021
Flag Lowering for Victims in San JoseDate Posted: May 26, 2021
First Chance Delaware Announces Wilmington Community of HopeDate Posted: May 26, 2021
State Auditor McGuiness Launches Historic Transparency InitiativeDate Posted: May 26, 2021
Young Anglers Invited to Enter Semi-virtual Youth Fishing TournamentDate Posted: May 26, 2021
New Head of DNREC Division of Air Quality NamedDate Posted: May 26, 2021
The Mezzanine Gallery to Exhibit Paintings by Howard J. EberleDate Posted: May 26, 2021
FEMA Mitigation Grant Application Period OpenDate Posted: May 26, 2021
Del. will Issue Emergency Benefits for May to All SNAP Households, Eligible TANF and General Assistance HouseholdsDate Posted: May 25, 2021
COVID-19 Community Resilience Initiative WebinarDate Posted: May 25, 2021
Affordable Technology Access for Lower Income Families – May 27thDate Posted: May 25, 2021
State of Delaware Announces DE Wins! Incentive Program to Drive COVID-19 VaccinationsDate Posted: May 25, 2021
May 25, 2021: COVID-19 BriefingDate Posted: May 25, 2021
DHSS Announces Community Grant Opportunity to Respond to Opioid CrisisDate Posted: May 24, 2021
Weekly COVID-19 Update – May 21, 2021: Delaware Sees Significant Decrease in Cases, DeathsDate Posted: May 21, 2021

Department of Agriculture | Date Posted: Friday, July 2, 2021

DOVER, Del. (July 2, 2021) – The Delaware Department of Agriculture is warning all residents about two deadly species of hemlock recently found in Sussex County. Environmental scientists have confirmed the presence of poison hemlock (Conicum maculatum) and spotted water hemlock (Cicuta maculata). All parts of the plants – leaves, stems, flowers, and roots – are poisonous to humans and animals.
Both hemlocks are in bloom from June through August. As members of the wild carrot family, both plants have small white flowers in umbrella-like groupings. People may mistake these plants for wild carrot, commonly called Queen Anne’s lace, or wild parsnip or wild celery. People who like to forage for natural foods or cut wildflowers are advised to avoid wild carrot-looking plants to prevent the possibility of being poisoned.
Both the poison hemlock and spotted water hemlock were found in wetland areas in Sussex County.
Wild Poison Hemlock plant with spotted stalk is a poisonous and toxic weed. Leaf structure of a mature poison hemlock plant. The stem of the poison hemlock plant, with characteristic purple spots and blotches.Poison hemlock is also known to grow in ditches, meadows, pastures, and the edges of cultivated fields.
Poison hemlock is an invasive biennial that grows from six to eight feet tall. The stems are hairless and have purple blotches. The plant emits an odor, but people should not crush any part of the plant to smell it because toxic alkaline oils can be released, poisoning the person. Leaves are alternate, dark glossy green, fern-like, triangular, lacey with veins running through the tips of the leaf serrations.
Native to Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia, poison hemlock was introduced into the United States in the 1800s as an ornamental garden plant.
Spotted water hemlock is a native plant that grows up to six feet tall. The stems can vary in color from solid green or purple to green with purple spots or stripes. The leaves are lacey and fern-like, with veins ending at the base of the notch of the leaf edge.
If residents suspect they have found either of these plants, take a picture and email it to DDA.Marketing@delaware.gov for identification.
The stems of the spotted water hemlock can vary in color. The dusty color on the stem can rub off and cause illness.Residents should not try to eradicate these plants themselves. Residents should find a licensed aquatic pest control company at https://de.gov/pesticides to treat for poison hemlock or spotted water hemlock. It is recommended that people wear long sleeves, long pants, and gloves when working with these toxic plants and with any unknown plant life in general. The sap can cause skin irritation or a rash in some people, and others may experience serious illness. Mowing the plants is not recommended because toxic particles can be released and inhaled in the air.
Depending on the exposure – direct contact, ingestion, and inhalation – signs and symptoms of poisoning by spotted water hemlock and poison hemlock in humans can appear as soon as 15 minutes to hours and can include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, irregular heartbeat, dilation of the pupils, respiratory distress, muscle damage, renal failure, and central nervous system involvement causing seizures, with potential for death.
If a person may have ingested either of these plants or cut one of the plants inhaling the toxic particles, call the Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222 or 911.
The identification and eradication of these plants are crucial in meadows and fields where livestock and horses graze. If any part of the plant is ingested, toxicity can occur in animals. All classes of livestock are susceptible to poison hemlock. Ingestion of the plant may lead to death within just 2-3 hours, depending on the amount consumed. Fresh leaves of poison hemlock are unpalatable to animals, so livestock and horses seldom eat hemlock if other feed is available.
Clinical signs in livestock usually begin within 30-60 minutes after ingestion. There is no antidote. When animals ingest the plant, the toxin affects nerve impulse transmission to the muscles, and animals die due to respiratory failure. Animals often will be found dead before the illness is determined.
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Related Topics:  poison hemlock, poisonous plant, spotted water hemlock, Sussex County

Keep up to date by receiving a daily digest email, around noon, of current news release posts from state agencies on news.delaware.gov.
Here you can subscribe to future news updates.

Department of Agriculture | Date Posted: Friday, July 2, 2021

DOVER, Del. (July 2, 2021) – The Delaware Department of Agriculture is warning all residents about two deadly species of hemlock recently found in Sussex County. Environmental scientists have confirmed the presence of poison hemlock (Conicum maculatum) and spotted water hemlock (Cicuta maculata). All parts of the plants – leaves, stems, flowers, and roots – are poisonous to humans and animals.
Both hemlocks are in bloom from June through August. As members of the wild carrot family, both plants have small white flowers in umbrella-like groupings. People may mistake these plants for wild carrot, commonly called Queen Anne’s lace, or wild parsnip or wild celery. People who like to forage for natural foods or cut wildflowers are advised to avoid wild carrot-looking plants to prevent the possibility of being poisoned.
Both the poison hemlock and spotted water hemlock were found in wetland areas in Sussex County.
Wild Poison Hemlock plant with spotted stalk is a poisonous and toxic weed. Leaf structure of a mature poison hemlock plant. The stem of the poison hemlock plant, with characteristic purple spots and blotches.Poison hemlock is also known to grow in ditches, meadows, pastures, and the edges of cultivated fields.
Poison hemlock is an invasive biennial that grows from six to eight feet tall. The stems are hairless and have purple blotches. The plant emits an odor, but people should not crush any part of the plant to smell it because toxic alkaline oils can be released, poisoning the person. Leaves are alternate, dark glossy green, fern-like, triangular, lacey with veins running through the tips of the leaf serrations.
Native to Europe, northern Africa, and western Asia, poison hemlock was introduced into the United States in the 1800s as an ornamental garden plant.
Spotted water hemlock is a native plant that grows up to six feet tall. The stems can vary in color from solid green or purple to green with purple spots or stripes. The leaves are lacey and fern-like, with veins ending at the base of the notch of the leaf edge.
If residents suspect they have found either of these plants, take a picture and email it to DDA.Marketing@delaware.gov for identification.
The stems of the spotted water hemlock can vary in color. The dusty color on the stem can rub off and cause illness.Residents should not try to eradicate these plants themselves. Residents should find a licensed aquatic pest control company at https://de.gov/pesticides to treat for poison hemlock or spotted water hemlock. It is recommended that people wear long sleeves, long pants, and gloves when working with these toxic plants and with any unknown plant life in general. The sap can cause skin irritation or a rash in some people, and others may experience serious illness. Mowing the plants is not recommended because toxic particles can be released and inhaled in the air.
Depending on the exposure – direct contact, ingestion, and inhalation – signs and symptoms of poisoning by spotted water hemlock and poison hemlock in humans can appear as soon as 15 minutes to hours and can include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, irregular heartbeat, dilation of the pupils, respiratory distress, muscle damage, renal failure, and central nervous system involvement causing seizures, with potential for death.
If a person may have ingested either of these plants or cut one of the plants inhaling the toxic particles, call the Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222 or 911.
The identification and eradication of these plants are crucial in meadows and fields where livestock and horses graze. If any part of the plant is ingested, toxicity can occur in animals. All classes of livestock are susceptible to poison hemlock. Ingestion of the plant may lead to death within just 2-3 hours, depending on the amount consumed. Fresh leaves of poison hemlock are unpalatable to animals, so livestock and horses seldom eat hemlock if other feed is available.
Clinical signs in livestock usually begin within 30-60 minutes after ingestion. There is no antidote. When animals ingest the plant, the toxin affects nerve impulse transmission to the muscles, and animals die due to respiratory failure. Animals often will be found dead before the illness is determined.
###
Print

Related Topics:  poison hemlock, poisonous plant, spotted water hemlock, Sussex County

Keep up to date by receiving a daily digest email, around noon, of current news release posts from state agencies on news.delaware.gov.
Here you can subscribe to future news updates.

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