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MIL OSI Translation. Region: Germany / Deutschland –

Source: Destatis Federal Statistical Office

Press release No. 510 from December 16, 2020

Birth rate slightly down in the first three quarters of 2020
The birth rate has fallen slightly among German women and sharply among foreigners since 2016

WIESBADEN – The decline in birth rates in 2019 continued into the first three quarters of 2020. As reported by the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) on the basis of preliminary results, 580,342 children were born in Germany from January to September 2020. That was 6,155 or around 1% less than in the same period of the previous year. Whether the corona pandemic is having an impact on the population’s birth behavior will not be known until the birth count for the months of December 2020 to February 2021 is available.

Fewer potential mothers and falling fertility rates

Since the last noticeable rise in births of 7% to 792 141 babies in 2016 compared to 2015, the number of births has tended to decrease. In 2019, 14,051 fewer children were born than in 2016 (-2%). There were two main reasons for this: On the one hand, the number of potential mothers (women between the ages of 15 and 49) decreased by 2% in this period. On the other hand, the total fertility rate fell from 2016 to 2019 by 3% from 1.59 to 1.54 children per woman.

10% decrease in the birth rate of foreign women from 2016 to 2019

For women with German citizenship, the total fertility rate fell by 2% between 2016 and 2019, from 1.46 to 1.43 children per woman. For women with foreign nationality it fell five times as much, namely by 10% from 2.28 to 2.06 children per woman.

Among women with the ten most common foreign nationalities in Germany in 2019, the fertility rate only increased among Romanians between 2016 and 2019 (+ 3% to 2.2 children per woman). In the two largest groups of women, Turkish women (-5% to 1.9 children per woman) and Polish women (-7% to 1.6 children per woman), the fertility rate declined. The fertility rate fell very sharply among Syrians and Iraqis (-28% in each case to 3.9 and 3.2 children per woman, respectively), i.e. among foreigners who came to Germany mainly as refugees from 2014 onwards. The birth rate in 2019 was highest among Kosovar women with 4.2 children per woman. Italian women had the lowest fertility rate with 1.5 children per woman.

Significant differences in age at birth for foreign mothers

The average age of the mother when a child was born rose by a total of 0.5 years to 31.5 years between 2016 and 2019. In 2019, German mothers were on average 31.9 and foreign mothers 30.2 years old. In a comparison of the ten most common nationalities in Germany, Bulgarians gave birth particularly early, at an average of 27.6 years, and Russian women, particularly late at an average of 32.6 years. When the first child was born, the range of the mother’s age was even greater at 5.4 years: Bulgarian women were on average 25.8 years and Russians 31.2 years old when they gave birth to their first child.

The average age at the birth of a child rose particularly sharply for Syrian (+1.7 years) and Iraqi (+1.3 years) mothers between 2016 and 2019. The average age of Syrian women increased from 27.3 to 29.0 years, and of Iraqi women from 28.3 to 29.6 years. There are two main reasons for this: On the one hand, significantly fewer women of these nationalities became mothers for the first time in 2019. On the other hand, the Syrian and Iraqi mothers were significantly older when they gave birth in 2019 than in 2016.

Number and birth indicators of women in 2016 and 2019

Women 1
Live born
Summarized fertility rate 2
Average age of mother at birth 3
2016
2019
2016
2019
2016
2019
2016
2019
number
Children per woman
Years

All in all
41 743 048
42 090 810
792 141
778 090
x
x
x
x
including women aged 15 to 49
together
17 357 906
16 929 720
791 657
777 620
1.59
1.54
31.0
31.5
of which according to the nationality of the woman
German
14 721 963
13 993 957
607 230
588 122
1.46
1.43
31.4
31.9
not German
2,635,944
2 935 764
184 427
189 498
2.28
2.06
29.7
30.2
including the ten most common foreign citizenships
Turkish
417 387
379 631
21 809
19 592
2.0
1.9
30.3
30.6
Polish
227 795
235 230
11 767
10 946
1.7
1.6
30.1
30.6
Romanian
153 489
203 996
10 497
14 250
2.1
2.2
28.6
28.8
Syrian
97 368
159 261
18 481
20 749
5.4
3.9
27.3
29.0
Italian
140 593
142 117
6 443
6 806
1.5
1.5
30.8
31.0
Bulgarian
77 457
100 510
4 999
5,935
2.1
2.1
27.9
27.6
Russian
92 018
97 270
5,951
5 234
2.0
1.7
31.7
32.6
Iraqi
36 722
52 908
5 522
5 413
4.4
3.2
28.3
29.6
Serbian
48 800
52 679
5 699
5 043
4.0
3.4
27.6
28.6
Kosovar
41 678
46 075
6 825
6 210
5.0
4.2
29.1
29.4
newsworthy
Other EU countries
1 117 081
1 222 118
56 386
62 186
1.64
1.68
30.3
30.3
rest of the world
1,518,863
1 713 646
128 041
127 312
2.73
2.32
29.4
30.2

Methodological notes

The total fertility rate is used to describe the current fertility behavior. It indicates how many children a woman would have in the course of her life if her birth behavior were the same as that of all women between 15 and 49 in the year under review. The actual final number of children per woman achieved may differ from this. According to the results of the 2018 microcensus, the final number of children among women between the ages of 45 and 49 averaged 1.6 children per woman. For German women it was 1.5 children per woman and for foreigners 1.9 children per woman.

Further data and long time series for Statistics of births (12612) are in our GENESIS-Online database.

German EU Council Presidency in the field of statisticsSince July 1, the Federal Statistical Office has been in charge of the EU Council Presidency, chaired by President Dr. Georg Thiel the Council Working Group on Statistics. About our Activities in the context of the EU Council Presidency we inform on the special page www.destatis.de/eu2020.

You can find European statistics in our data “Europe in numbers

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EDITOR’S NOTE: This article is a translation. Apologies should the grammar and / or sentence structure not be perfect.

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