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Source: New Zealand Ministry of Health

The new Dunedin Hospital project today received consent to demolish the Cadbury factory buildings to make way for the new Inpatients Building. 
 
Programme Director, Mike Barns says this is a major step forward for the project as the entire hospital site can now be cleared for the new hospital by June 2021.
 
“We’re very pleased consent has been granted and I’d like to acknowledge all the support from the community for the project and the new hospital,” says Mr Barns.
 
“We’ve been very aware of the concerns raised about the heritage aspects of the Cadbury factory. We’re taking every step we reasonably can to mitigate these.
 
“This includes retaining the historic Dairy Building at the south-east corner of the site. We will also undertake a detailed photographic and video building recording of the Cadbury factory buildings by a qualified heritage practitioner.
 
“Today’s milestone shows the project is finishing the year with real progress. Demolition of the Outpatients Building site is on track for completion by Christmas, and having now secured this consent, the entire hospital site is expected to be cleared by June next year.
 
“This is great news for Dunedin and the Southern region. The new Dunedin Hospital will transform how healthcare is delivered across the region, improving health outcomes for New Zealanders for decades to come. 
 
“The new Dunedin Hospital project also offers many opportunities for jobs and businesses, and will support Dunedin’s long term urban renewal plan,” says Mr Barns.
 
Notes to editors
In addition to retaining the Dairy Building and recording the Cadbury factory, key conditions of consent include: 

  • Each building to be demolished must be surveyed by a qualified heritage practitioner to identify significant historical or archaeological features. 
  • Significant historical or archaeological features and historic building materials must be identified for salvage. 
  • Any historic building materials which can be salvaged are to be reused in the hospital development or made available to the community.
  • Vibration from demolition activities above certain levels requires consultation with affected neighbours.
  • The demolition plan must include plans for traffic management, noise and vibration management, and dust control. 

Media contact 
Kirsty Doig
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