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Source: United States Department of Justice

A Colorado resident was sentenced to 15 months in prison yesterday for his role in a biodiesel tax credit fraud scheme, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division.

According to court documents and statements made in court, from 2010 to 2013, Calvin Glover and his coconspirators defrauded the United States of $7.2 million by filing false claims with the IRS for renewable fuel tax credits. Glover and his coconspirators formed a company, Shintan Inc. (Shintan), that purported to be in the business of producing renewable fuels. Glover and his coconspirators then submitted at least 22 claims to the IRS which falsely stated that Shintan had produced over seven million gallons of renewable fuel that qualified Shintan to receive refundable tax credits. Glover signed a number of false documents in support of these claims, even though he had no knowledge of Shintan ever producing any biodiesel or biodiesel mixtures.

For his role in the scheme, Glover received nearly $600,000 of the fraud proceeds, which he did not report on his individual tax returns.

On Aug. 8, 2020, Glover pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States.

In addition to the term of imprisonment imposed, U.S. District Judge Raymond P. Moore ordered Glover to serve three years of supervised release and to pay approximately $591,454 in restitution to the United States.

Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Zuckerman thanked special agents of IRS-Criminal Investigation and Environmental Protection Agency-Criminal Investigation, who conducted the investigation, and Trial Attorneys Sarah A. Kiewlicz and Stephen K. Moulton of the Tax Division, who prosecuted the case.

Additional information about the Tax Division and its enforcement efforts may be found on the division’s website.

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