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Seattle – U.S. Attorney Brian T. Moran today announced the University of Washington is receiving more than $1 million in a Department of Justice grant for a research and evaluation project that identifies data-driven programs for reducing crime and promoting justice.  Nationwide, the $43 million in grant awards span research topic priorities such as prisoner reentry, terrorism prevention, human trafficking, and police officer safety and wellness.

The awards are part of a strategic plan developed by Office of Justice Program’s (OJP) National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to advance technology, strengthen scientific research, and translate knowledge to practice.  They represent NIJ’s broader effort to include more diversity of disciplines, such as physical and social sciences, to link areas of research that have not previously been connected.

“The more we know about crime—the better we understand its causes and consequences—the greater our chances of finding sustainable solutions to the public safety problems confronting our communities,” said OJP Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Katharine T. Sullivan.  “The research supported by these awards will expand our knowledge about what works to reduce crime, curb reoffending, and protect our criminal justice professionals, and this new knowledge will put us a step closer to achieving a more just and lawful society.”

The research addresses critical needs such as prisoner reentry, emphasizing innovative strategies to reintegrate offenders into communities, and reduce recidivism.  Today’s announcement includes three projects that will study reentry initiatives, including those in rural communities.  The research will advance the body of knowledge on promising practices in the field of offender reentry.

“The University of Washington is receiving the largest share of $2.2 million aimed at research and evaluation projects on violence against women,” said U.S. Attorney Moran.  “The projects receiving grant funding examine a broad range of topics including the crimes of homicide, intimate partner and dating violence, rape and sexual assault, stalking, and trafficking, along with criminal justice system responses, procedures, and policies.”

The total amount coming to the UW for this research is $1,022,215.

For a complete list of individual grant programs, award amounts, and jurisdictions that will receive funding, click here.  More information about OJP and its components can be found at www.ojp.gov.

The year 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the Department of Justice. Learn more about the history of our agency at www.Justice.gov/Celebrating150Years

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