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MIL OSI Translation. Region: Germany / Deutschland –

Source: Federal Ministry of Education and Research

07.10.2020Press release: 148/2020

“As Federal Research Minister, I am delighted with all the scientists in the country about this double award for two researchers who work in Germany,” says Minister Karliczek. © BMBF / Hans-Joachim RickelThe microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier, head of the “Max Planck Research Center for the Science of Pathogens” in Berlin, will be awarded the Nobel Prize for Chemistry this year together with Jennifer A. Doudna. Federal Research Minister Anja Karliczek explains: “I congratulate Professor Emmanuelle Charpentier on her Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Born in France, she has been working as a scientist in Germany for several years. Professor Charpentier is the director of the Max Planck Research Center for the Science of Pathogens in Berlin. Both decisions by the Stockholm Prize Committee show that Germany is an excellent and competitive location for science. As Federal Research Minister, I am delighted with all the scientists in the country that two researchers who work in Germany have been honored. Professor Charpentier shares the Nobel Prize with American Jennifer A. Doudna for the development of the CRISPR-Cas9 gene scissors. This is a fascinating new method for genome editing. This allows selected locations in the genome to be cut out very precisely and efficiently and the genome to be modified. This results in extensive application possibilities in many areas of molecular genetics, for example in plant breeding or in medicine. With this new method, completely new paths are open in both disciplines. The benefits and risks must be carefully discussed with and in society. Ms. Charpentier has headed the “Max Planck Research Center for the Science of Pathogens” in Berlin since 2018, after being appointed director of the “Regulation in Infection Biology” department in 2015 Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin. Professor Charpentier, like Professor Genzel, represents the internationality of today’s science. She studied biochemistry and microbiology at the University of Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris and also received her doctorate. After research stays in the USA, she completed her habilitation at the University of Vienna and then went to Sweden. Then she came to Germany. From 2013 to 2015 she was professor at the Medical University of Hanover and headed the regulation department in infection biology at the Helmholtz Center for Infection Research in Braunschweig. In 2014 she received an Alexander von Humboldt Professorship, which attracts top foreign scientists to research in Germany. From 2015 to 2018 she was director at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin. In 2016 she received the Leibniz Prize – one of the most prestigious awards that German science has to offer. Ms. Charpentier has been the founding and acting director of the Max Planck Research Center for the Science of Pathogens in Berlin since 2018. At this point I would like to emphasize once again that the conditions that the federal and state governments of German science comply with the Pact for Research Guarantee innovation, are internationally unique. As you can see, this now attracts many top international scientists. Germany is very attractive. This benefits all of us, because in the end top research also benefits the people in our country. This means that we remain a country of innovation and thus lay the foundation for prosperity for future generations. “

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