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Source: Amnesty International –

The frequent threats, attacks and killings of people defending land, territory and the environment in Colombia have highlighted the government’s failure to address the serious crisis facing the country’s human rights defenders, Amnesty International said in a new report published today.

Why do they want to kill us? The lack of a safe space to defend human rights in Colombia examines the reasons behind the violence against community leaders living in geographically strategic and natural resource-rich areas. The report also analyses the ineffectiveness of the protection measures implemented by the government since the Peace Agreement signed with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) in 2016.

“For years, Colombia has been one of the world’s most dangerous countries for people who are defending human rights, territory, and natural resources. Since the Peace Agreement was signed in 2016, however, things have got even worse, particularly for those living in geographically strategic and natural resource-rich areas. In 2020 alone, XXX social leaders have been killed,” said Erika Guevara-Rosas, Americas Director at Amnesty International.

“Defenders will continue to die until the government effectively addresses structural issues such as the deep inequality and marginalization suffered by communities, ownership and control of the land, substitution of illicit crops, and justice.”

The report examines the cases of four communities at particular risk: the Process of Black Communities (PCN) in Buenaventura, Valle del Cauca; the Catatumbo Social Integration Committee (CISCA) in Norte de Santander; the Kubeo-Sikuani Indigenous Ancestral Settlement (ASEINPOME) in Meta; and the Association for the Sustainable Integrated Development of the Perla Amazónica (ADISPA) in Putumayo.

For years, Colombia has been one of the world’s most dangerous countries for people who are defending human rights, territory, and natural resources. Since the Peace Agreement was signed in 2016, however, things have got even worse, particularly for those living in geographically strategic and natural resource-rich areas

MIL OSI NGO