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Source: Aisle of Wight

01 Oct 2020

Be prepared in case you need to self-isolate.

That’s the message from the Isle of Wight Council in the week it became law for people to self-isolate if they test positive for coronavirus or are contacted by the test and trace service — otherwise risk being fined.

To support the community through this difficult time, the council has produced a helpful self-isolation guide — an online toolkit containing advice, support and signposting information to ensure residents are well prepared.

Council leader, Dave Stewart, said: “We know self-isolation isn’t easy but it is vitally important people do take the time to make a plan in case they are ever asked to self-isolate.

“How will I access food? Who will collect my medication? Who will walk the dog? These are the kinds of questions residents need to consider and why good preparation will help ease some of the concerns they may have.

“Our self-isolation guide can help by providing useful telephone numbers for local support and delivery services, website links for further assistance as well as top tips and general advice on staying healthy and active at home while self-isolating. I would urge all residents to download it now.”

Residents will need to self-isolate if they:

• have any symptoms of coronavirus (a high temperature, a new, continuous cough or a loss or change to your sense of smell or taste);

• have tested positive for coronavirus — this means you have coronavirus;

• live with someone who has symptoms (if the person subsequently is confirmed negative, there is no need to self-isolate as a contact) or has tested positive;

• someone in your support bubble has symptoms (if the person subsequently is confirmed negative, there is no need to self-isolate as a contact) or has tested positive;

• are told by NHS Test and Trace that you’ve been in contact with a person with coronavirus;

• are returning from a country that does not have an air-bridge agreement.

If any of these things happen to you, you must stay at home because this helps to stop the virus from spreading to other people.

It is more than likely you will have little or no notice that you must self-isolate.

Self-isolation is not the same as lockdown — it is more restrictive and it will help if you have a plan.

The legal duty to self-isolate came into force on Monday (September 28) with fines starting at £1,000 and increasing up to £10,000 for repeat offenders or serious breaches.

People who have received a positive test must isolate for ten days after displaying symptoms or their test date if they do not have symptoms, while members of their household must isolate for 14 days.

You must:

• not go to work, school or public places – work from home if you can;

• not go on public transport or use taxis;

• not go out to get food and medicine;

• not have visitors in your home, including friends and family – except for people providing essential care;

not go out to exercise.

Download the council’s useful self-isolation planning guide to help you and your household to prepare if you must self-isolate in the future.

Factfile

  • It is more than likely you will have little or no notice that you must self-isolate.
  • It is now a legal requirement to self-isolate if you are told to do so.

MIL OSI United Kingdom