Post sponsored by NewzEngine.com

Source: United States House of Representatives – Congressman Max Rose (NY-11)

Congressman Max Rose and Staten Island Borough President James Oddo today called for Mayor Bill de Blasio to allocate military medical personnel that have been deployed to New York City to Staten Island hospitals to help ease the burden on the Island’s medical professionals and nursing homes throughout the city. Nearly 1,100 military medical professionals have been deployed to the New York and New Jersey region, and while allocation of the personnel in New York City is up to the discretion of the Mayor, to date they have only been deployed to New York City Health+Hosptial facilities, of which there are none on Staten Island.

 

“Like you, we hope that the peak of the pandemic is behind us. Yet we know that even as the number of coronavirus cases subside, the stress on our hospital workers will continue as non-coronavirus cases return in overwhelming numbers to seek treatment that has been deferred during the crisis,” wrote Rose and Oddo in a letter to Mayor de Blasio. “While military medical personnel may be deployed elsewhere as other hotspots appear around the country, many will remain in our city for the weeks to come. We therefore request that you consider the need of independent and private hospitals on Staten Island whose staff and patients could benefit from reinforcement. Lastly, as the need in hospitals decreases, we ask that you consider deploying personnel to nursing homes around the city, who have continued to struggle with staffing shortages as well as severe outbreaks of coronavirus, which all too often prove fatal.”

 

Full text of letter HERE and below:

 

Dear Mayor De Blasio,

 

We are writing to request that you adjust current policies allocating military medical personnel deployed to New York City. Currently, your administration has decided to deploy these personnel solely to H+H public hospitals. However, as you well know, Staten Island does not have an H+H public hospital in the borough, meaning that while nearly 1,100 servicemembers have been deployed to the New York/New Jersey region in response to the novel coronavirus, not a single one has come to the relief of Staten Island. Our doctors, nurses, and other medical staff have worked around the clock during this crisis, even while their colleagues and relatives have gotten sick and shown up in their wards. They deserve the same support and relief afforded to other hospital staff around the city, regardless of their hospitals’ ownership status.

 

The coronavirus pandemic has presented what is perhaps the test of our generation. Our city, state, and nation have demonstrated our capacity to meet great challenges, by coordinating the mass production of ventilators, PPE, and test kits. Yet we’ve found it far harder to generate the necessary medical personnel to meet the needs of our hospitals, clinics, and nursing homes. Volunteers have arrived from out of state to swell these numbers, and we’ve even taken the step of calling for retired and former medical practitioners to return to duty during this crisis. You have also called for 1,450 medical military personnel to be deployed to the city to augment our civilian healthcare workforce.

 

The need for personnel is clear, which is why leaving Staten Island out of the deployment is inexplicable. Staten Island hospitals, while not public hospitals under the H+H banner, serve as safety net hospitals for Staten Island’s low-income and Medicaid recipients in the absence of a public option. H+H hospitals are simply out of reach of most Staten Islanders, who for lack of transit options face upwards of an hour commute by bus if they can’t drive by car. Lastly, there is the question of inclusion, in that once again Staten Island is left out of a deployment intended to benefit of all New Yorkers.

 

Like you, we hope that the peak of the pandemic is behind us. Yet we know that even as the number of coronavirus cases subside, the stress on our hospital workers will continue as non-coronavirus cases return in overwhelming numbers to seek treatment that has been deferred during the crisis. While military medical personnel may be deployed elsewhere as other hotspots appear around the country, many will remain in our city for the weeks to come. We therefore request that you consider the need of independent and private hospitals on Staten Island whose staff and patients could benefit from reinforcement. Lastly, as the need in hospitals decreases, we ask that you consider deploying personnel to nursing homes around the city, who have continued to struggle with staffing shortages as well as severe outbreaks of coronavirus, which all too often prove fatal.

 

Thank you for your consideration of this request.

 

Sincerely,

 

Max Rose                                            James Oddo

Member of Congress                          Staten Island Borough President

 

###

Source: United States House of Representatives – Congressman Max Rose (NY-11)

Congressman Max Rose and Staten Island Borough President James Oddo today called for Mayor Bill de Blasio to allocate military medical personnel that have been deployed to New York City to Staten Island hospitals to help ease the burden on the Island’s medical professionals and nursing homes throughout the city. Nearly 1,100 military medical professionals have been deployed to the New York and New Jersey region, and while allocation of the personnel in New York City is up to the discretion of the Mayor, to date they have only been deployed to New York City Health+Hosptial facilities, of which there are none on Staten Island.

 

“Like you, we hope that the peak of the pandemic is behind us. Yet we know that even as the number of coronavirus cases subside, the stress on our hospital workers will continue as non-coronavirus cases return in overwhelming numbers to seek treatment that has been deferred during the crisis,” wrote Rose and Oddo in a letter to Mayor de Blasio. “While military medical personnel may be deployed elsewhere as other hotspots appear around the country, many will remain in our city for the weeks to come. We therefore request that you consider the need of independent and private hospitals on Staten Island whose staff and patients could benefit from reinforcement. Lastly, as the need in hospitals decreases, we ask that you consider deploying personnel to nursing homes around the city, who have continued to struggle with staffing shortages as well as severe outbreaks of coronavirus, which all too often prove fatal.”

 

Full text of letter HERE and below:

 

Dear Mayor De Blasio,

 

We are writing to request that you adjust current policies allocating military medical personnel deployed to New York City. Currently, your administration has decided to deploy these personnel solely to H+H public hospitals. However, as you well know, Staten Island does not have an H+H public hospital in the borough, meaning that while nearly 1,100 servicemembers have been deployed to the New York/New Jersey region in response to the novel coronavirus, not a single one has come to the relief of Staten Island. Our doctors, nurses, and other medical staff have worked around the clock during this crisis, even while their colleagues and relatives have gotten sick and shown up in their wards. They deserve the same support and relief afforded to other hospital staff around the city, regardless of their hospitals’ ownership status.

 

The coronavirus pandemic has presented what is perhaps the test of our generation. Our city, state, and nation have demonstrated our capacity to meet great challenges, by coordinating the mass production of ventilators, PPE, and test kits. Yet we’ve found it far harder to generate the necessary medical personnel to meet the needs of our hospitals, clinics, and nursing homes. Volunteers have arrived from out of state to swell these numbers, and we’ve even taken the step of calling for retired and former medical practitioners to return to duty during this crisis. You have also called for 1,450 medical military personnel to be deployed to the city to augment our civilian healthcare workforce.

 

The need for personnel is clear, which is why leaving Staten Island out of the deployment is inexplicable. Staten Island hospitals, while not public hospitals under the H+H banner, serve as safety net hospitals for Staten Island’s low-income and Medicaid recipients in the absence of a public option. H+H hospitals are simply out of reach of most Staten Islanders, who for lack of transit options face upwards of an hour commute by bus if they can’t drive by car. Lastly, there is the question of inclusion, in that once again Staten Island is left out of a deployment intended to benefit of all New Yorkers.

 

Like you, we hope that the peak of the pandemic is behind us. Yet we know that even as the number of coronavirus cases subside, the stress on our hospital workers will continue as non-coronavirus cases return in overwhelming numbers to seek treatment that has been deferred during the crisis. While military medical personnel may be deployed elsewhere as other hotspots appear around the country, many will remain in our city for the weeks to come. We therefore request that you consider the need of independent and private hospitals on Staten Island whose staff and patients could benefit from reinforcement. Lastly, as the need in hospitals decreases, we ask that you consider deploying personnel to nursing homes around the city, who have continued to struggle with staffing shortages as well as severe outbreaks of coronavirus, which all too often prove fatal.

 

Thank you for your consideration of this request.

 

Sincerely,

 

Max Rose                                            James Oddo

Member of Congress                          Staten Island Borough President

 

###

MIL OSI USA News