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Source: Government of Queensland

Communities right across Queensland are being urged to pause and reflect on the consequences of road crashes, as the world commemorates the United Nations World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims.

Transport and Main Roads Minister Mark Bailey said while the news cycle may move on, it’s the victim’s families, friends, communities and first responders who will bear the lifelong pain and trauma of losing a loved one.

“We often take for granted we will reach our destination safely, and sadly this is not the case for too many Australians who are killed or seriously injured in crashes,” Mr Bailey said.

October was one of the worst months for fatal crashes so far this year, with 23 people killed on Queensland roads.

“We’re only a few weeks away from the start of summer school holidays and the Christmas season – we want it to be a happy time for everyone.

“Every time you get behind the wheel, make sure you’re not tired, that you stick to the speed limit, haven’t been drinking or taking drugs, buckle up and put your phone away.”

The UN’s 2019 theme is life is not a car part, reminding people that unlike car parts, lives are not replaceable.

Mr Bailey also commended Safer Australian Roads and Highways and its founder Peter Frazer for launching CARE Day, which ties in with Sunday’s UN-led commemorations.

The nation’s first CARE day (Caudell Altoft Remembrance Event) specifically acknowledges Queensland traffic controllers Suzanne Caudell and Ken Altoft who were killed in separate incidents by distracted speeding drivers while at work.

“CARE day pays tribute to all road workers tragically killed while on the job in Queensland and across the country,” Mr Bailey said. 

“I’m urging everyone to slow down when approaching and going through any work site, obey any signage and traffic controllers and watch out for workers.”

ENDS

Media contact: Francis Dela Cruz – 0420 592 078

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