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Source: Government of Australia Capital Territory

Released 21/10/2019

Road users are advised that a traffic switch is expected to take place today, Monday 21 October 2019, on John Gorton Drive to allow work to be carried out on the future northbound lanes.

Work to duplicate the next 500 metre section of John Gorton Drive, formally known as Coppins Crossing Road, began in April this year.

In addition to duplicating the road, the project also includes providing one additional signalised intersection and one unsignalised left in / left out intersection into the future suburb of Whitlam. The project will also deliver on-road cycle lanes in both directions for the length of the duplicated road and sections of off-road shared path beside the northbound lanes that will eventually link with shared-paths being constructed as part of the Whitlam estate.

Location and timing of changed traffic arrangements

A traffic switch on John Gorton Drive (formally Coppins Crossing Road) is expected to take place on Monday 21 October 2019 following morning peak and prior to the afternoon peak period. Both lanes of traffic will be moved onto the new future southbound lanes to allow work to be carried out on the future northbound lanes.

Roadside signage will alert road users to the changed traffic arrangements. In the event of unexpected delays, including inclement weather, road users should take note of roadside signage which will advise them of the new date.

This traffic switch completes the first major milestone of this project which is the construction of the new southbound carriageway. Roadworks remain on track for completion in mid-2020 when all four lanes will be opened to traffic.

For more information on these works and other projects in the area, visit www.tccs.act.gov.au or contact Access Canberra on 13 22 81.

– Statement ends –

Section: ACT Transport Canberra and City Services Directorate | Media Releases

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