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Source: United States House of Representatives – Congressman John Joyce (PA-13)

 

Today, Congressman John Joyce (PA-13) cosponsored the Higher Education Mental Health Act of 2019, a bill that seeks to address the growing number of students in higher education with mental health concerns. The measure was introduced by Rep. David Trone  (MD-06), and Reps. Susan Wild (D-PA), Donna Shalala (D-FL), and Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA) cosponsored the bill, which is also backed by Sen. Bob Casey (D-PA) in the United States Senate. 

This bill would establish a national commission to study the mental health concerns of students at institutions of higher education. The commission would include stakeholders that represent disability and student advocacy groups, institutions of higher education, individuals and students with mental health disabilities and family members of students enrolled in an institution of higher education. 

The bill would also require the commission to release a report at the end of its investigation that examines the services available to students with mental health disabilities and the current policies in place to help students remain in school and complete their degrees. The report will also provide detailed recommendations that institutions of higher education, states, and the federal government can make to improve the mental health services available to students and properly address the rising number of students with mental health concerns.

“Ensuring that young people, who are incredibly susceptible to mental health issues, get the care and attention they require should not be a partisan issue,” said Rep. Joyce. “As a physician, I’m proud to be working across the aisle on the Higher Education Mental Health Act so we can diagnose the growing trend of students suffering from psychological issues and develop the proper plans to reverse it.”

“I recently met with college presidents and students in our region, and I heard loud and clear that mental health is a growing concern for students across the country,” said Rep. Trone. “We need to ensure our colleges and universities have the resources they need to provide our students with top notch mental health care. This bipartisan bill will help us identify the actions we need to take to set our students up for success.”

“I applaud Rep. Trone for introducing the Higher Education Mental Health Act. As Penn State’s Center for Collegiate Mental Health reported in January, identifying and putting into practice methods for supporting students with mental health needs will benefit our youth, their families and the colleges and universities that serve them,” said Sen. Casey. “I look forward to working with Rep. Trone to pass this important legislation.”

“As a country, we have to begin taking mental health concerns seriously, and that starts by listening. By bringing everyone to the table – advocates, experts, stakeholders, and students – to help better understand the unique mental health needs of college-age students, we can better advocate for policy initiatives that truly support their needs here in Congress,” said Rep. Wild. “The Higher Education Mental Health Commission Act takes a necessary step toward making sure every student gets the support they need, and has an equal chance to succeed.”

“As a former leader of three institutions of higher education, I’ve seen first-hand the immense stresses students face as they work to obtain their degrees,” said Rep. Shalala. “Education is hard, but it should empower and inspire students, not leave them feeling broken. We need to take mental health at colleges and universities seriously, and this bill will give schools the resources to do just that,” said Rep. Shalala.

“A key component of mental health is early detection and treatment,” said Rep. Fitzpatrick. “With 75 percent of mental health conditions appearing before 24 years of age, it is important that institutions of higher learning have the professional resources and capabilities to improve retention rates and allow students to succeed. I am confident this bipartisan legislation will provide stronger learning environments in our nation’s colleges and universities.” 

You can learn more about the Higher Education Mental Health Act of 2019 here.

You can read the entire bill text here.

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Source: United States House of Representatives – Congressman John Joyce (PA-13)

 

Today, Congressman John Joyce (PA-13) cosponsored the Higher Education Mental Health Act of 2019, a bill that seeks to address the growing number of students in higher education with mental health concerns. The measure was introduced by Rep. David Trone  (MD-06), and Reps. Susan Wild (D-PA), Donna Shalala (D-FL), and Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA) cosponsored the bill, which is also backed by Sen. Bob Casey (D-PA) in the United States Senate. 

This bill would establish a national commission to study the mental health concerns of students at institutions of higher education. The commission would include stakeholders that represent disability and student advocacy groups, institutions of higher education, individuals and students with mental health disabilities and family members of students enrolled in an institution of higher education. 

The bill would also require the commission to release a report at the end of its investigation that examines the services available to students with mental health disabilities and the current policies in place to help students remain in school and complete their degrees. The report will also provide detailed recommendations that institutions of higher education, states, and the federal government can make to improve the mental health services available to students and properly address the rising number of students with mental health concerns.

“Ensuring that young people, who are incredibly susceptible to mental health issues, get the care and attention they require should not be a partisan issue,” said Rep. Joyce. “As a physician, I’m proud to be working across the aisle on the Higher Education Mental Health Act so we can diagnose the growing trend of students suffering from psychological issues and develop the proper plans to reverse it.”

“I recently met with college presidents and students in our region, and I heard loud and clear that mental health is a growing concern for students across the country,” said Rep. Trone. “We need to ensure our colleges and universities have the resources they need to provide our students with top notch mental health care. This bipartisan bill will help us identify the actions we need to take to set our students up for success.”

“I applaud Rep. Trone for introducing the Higher Education Mental Health Act. As Penn State’s Center for Collegiate Mental Health reported in January, identifying and putting into practice methods for supporting students with mental health needs will benefit our youth, their families and the colleges and universities that serve them,” said Sen. Casey. “I look forward to working with Rep. Trone to pass this important legislation.”

“As a country, we have to begin taking mental health concerns seriously, and that starts by listening. By bringing everyone to the table – advocates, experts, stakeholders, and students – to help better understand the unique mental health needs of college-age students, we can better advocate for policy initiatives that truly support their needs here in Congress,” said Rep. Wild. “The Higher Education Mental Health Commission Act takes a necessary step toward making sure every student gets the support they need, and has an equal chance to succeed.”

“As a former leader of three institutions of higher education, I’ve seen first-hand the immense stresses students face as they work to obtain their degrees,” said Rep. Shalala. “Education is hard, but it should empower and inspire students, not leave them feeling broken. We need to take mental health at colleges and universities seriously, and this bill will give schools the resources to do just that,” said Rep. Shalala.

“A key component of mental health is early detection and treatment,” said Rep. Fitzpatrick. “With 75 percent of mental health conditions appearing before 24 years of age, it is important that institutions of higher learning have the professional resources and capabilities to improve retention rates and allow students to succeed. I am confident this bipartisan legislation will provide stronger learning environments in our nation’s colleges and universities.” 

You can learn more about the Higher Education Mental Health Act of 2019 here.

You can read the entire bill text here.

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MIL OSI USA News